Trick or Treating Set for Halloween Night in Londonderry!

With Halloween and Londonderry Trick or Treating falling on a Thursday, Londonderry Police would like to remind everyone to have a fun and safe time. The police have released the following safety tips for a more enjoyable time by all.

Trick or Treating will be held this year on Halloween from 5 PM until 8 PM. This is an hour earlier than past years!

Plan your Halloween weekend ahead of time.

  • Find out which day in your community is the official trick or treat day/evening. Some communities will declare Saturday October 26, Sunday October 27, or Thursday October 31 (or all of those nights) as trick or treating nights.
  • You have a number of choices for both weekend days and evenings.
  • You can take your children to a sponsored event, or more than one event. Churches, shopping centers and malls, city parks and recreation departments, public libraries and schools can all be sponsors of trick or treat events this weekend.
  • You can do traditional house to house trick or treating.
  • You can host a Halloween party so the kids have a safe place to be. A video, apple cider, hot chocolate and pumpkins can go a long way in keeping kids safe.

Plan your trick or treating route.

  • If you live in an established child-oriented neighborhood, then you probably already have your route planned.
  • If you’re not certain what trick or treating route might be best, ask your neighbors. People who walk their dogs or jog can often tell you exactly where the safe, child-oriented neighborhoods are.

Make sure your children are costumed for safety.

  • It’s really important for each child to have glow bands or sticks, or reflective tape and flashlights so they can be seen in the dark.
  • We suggest you design their “lighting” so you can easily identify them, since we know kids tend to race around in the dark on this festive night. You may want to create a special pattern with reflective tape for the back of their costumes, or have a certain combination of glow band colors for children under your care.

Be visible and present for the children throughout the Halloween experience.

  • Follow your children around, whether they like it or not.
  • When the children knock on the door to get a treat, stand behind them on the porch. That way the kids are free to enjoy themselves, and the person opening the door can clearly see an adult is caring for these children.
  • We recommend you remain just as present and just as vigilant at sponsored events. All sorts of people attend these events, and occasionally someone who is up-to-no-good will attend as well.

Prepare your children for Halloween safety.

  • Provide each child with a wristband with your name and cell phone number. Or, write this information on a piece of paper and place it in each child’s pocket.
  • Remind them to not get near cars or into cars without your express permission.
  • Remind them of who they can ask for help if they get lost.
  • Remind them of the 4 adult behaviors to be alarmed about, and how to respond.
    • “If any adult or older kid offers you anything without asking me, step way back, yell, ‘NO!’, run away, and tell.” (This applies to candy, pets, treats, job offers, photographs, rides on motorcycles, etc.)
    • “If any adult or older kid asks for your help without asking me first, step way back, yell ‘NO!’, run away and tell.” (This applies to mailing a letter, picking something up for an injured person, approaching a car to give directions, doing yard work, looking for a lost puppy, etc.)
    • “If any adult or old kid asks you to keep a secret, step way back, yell ‘NO!’, run away, and tell.”
    • “If any adult or older kid touches your private parts (parts covered by a swim suit) or asks you to touch your private parts or somebody else’s, step way back, yell ‘NO!’, run away and tell.”

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Trick or Treat on Main Street Returns with Harvest Fest!

On Saturday October 19, RE/MAX 1st Choice will host Trick-or-Treat on Main Street. Many local area businesses will open their doors to young ghosts and goblins and their families for what has become a trick-or-treating tradition. RE/MAX 1st Choice, a community based real estate office, is again organizing the event to provide a safe Halloween experience for area children.

Trick-or-Treat on Main Street will be held from 12 until 2 PM. New to this year, due to changes with the annual Haunted Harvest, the costume parade will not take place. Instead, guests are invited to attend the Harvest Fest at Morrison House for fun and games. They are encouraged to bring their finished or partially finished maps for a chance to win prizes!

Walk-in registration begins Saturday, October 12 through October 19, at the RE/MAX 1st Choice office, located at Crossroads Mall in Londonderry, at the intersection of Routes 128 and 102. A map of participating businesses will be given out at registration.

Please contact RE/MAX 1st Choice at 603-425-2400 for more information.

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Londonderry Trick or Treating Set for Halloween Night

With Halloween and Londonderry Trick or Treating falling on a Wednesday, Londonderry Police would like to remind everyone to have a fun and safe time. The police have released the following safety tips for a more enjoyable time by all.

Trick or Treating will be held this year on Halloween from 5 PM until 8 PM. This is an hour earlier than past years!

Plan your Halloween weekend ahead of time.

  • Find out which day in your community is the official trick or treat day/evening. Some communities will declare Saturday October 27, Sunday October 28, or Wednesday October 31 (or all of those nights) as trick or treating nights.
  • You have a number of choices for both weekend days and evenings.
  • You can take your children to a sponsored event, or more than one event. Churches, shopping centers and malls, city parks and recreation departments, public libraries and schools can all be sponsors of trick or treat events this weekend.
  • You can do traditional house to house trick or treating.
  • You can host a Halloween party so the kids have a safe place to be. A video, apple cider, hot chocolate and pumpkins can go a long way in keeping kids safe.

Plan your trick or treating route.

  • If you live in an established child-oriented neighborhood, then you probably already have your route planned.
  • If you’re not certain what trick or treating route might be best, ask your neighbors. People who walk their dogs or jog can often tell you exactly where the safe, child-oriented neighborhoods are.

Make sure your children are costumed for safety.

  • It’s really important for each child to have glow bands or sticks, or reflective tape and flashlights so they can be seen in the dark.
  • We suggest you design their “lighting” so you can easily identify them, since we know kids tend to race around in the dark on this festive night. You may want to create a special pattern with reflective tape for the back of their costumes, or have a certain combination of glow band colors for children under your care.

Be visible and present for the children throughout the Halloween experience.

  • Follow your children around, whether they like it or not.
  • When the children knock on the door to get a treat, stand behind them on the porch. That way the kids are free to enjoy themselves, and the person opening the door can clearly see an adult is caring for these children.
  • We recommend you remain just as present and just as vigilant at sponsored events. All sorts of people attend these events, and occasionally someone who is up-to-no-good will attend as well.

Prepare your children for Halloween safety.

  • Provide each child with a wristband with your name and cell phone number. Or, write this information on a piece of paper and place it in each child’s pocket.
  • Remind them to not get near cars or into cars without your express permission.
  • Remind them of who they can ask for help if they get lost.
  • Remind them of the 4 adult behaviors to be alarmed about, and how to respond.
    • “If any adult or older kid offers you anything without asking me, step way back, yell, ‘NO!’, run away, and tell.” (This applies to candy, pets, treats, job offers, photographs, rides on motorcycles, etc.)
    • “If any adult or older kid asks for your help without asking me first, step way back, yell ‘NO!’, run away and tell.” (This applies to mailing a letter, picking something up for an injured person, approaching a car to give directions, doing yard work, looking for a lost puppy, etc.)
    • “If any adult or old kid asks you to keep a secret, step way back, yell ‘NO!’, run away, and tell.”
    • “If any adult or older kid touches your private parts (parts covered by a swim suit) or asks you to touch your private parts or somebody else’s, step way back, yell ‘NO!’, run away and tell.”

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Local Businesses Host Annual Trick or Treat Event

On Saturday October 27, RE/MAX 1st Choice will host Trick-or-Treat on Main Street. Many local area businesses will open their doors to young ghosts and goblins and their families for what has become a trick-or-treating tradition. RE/MAX 1st Choice, a community based real estate office, is again organizing the event to provide a safe Halloween experience for area children.

Trick-or-Treat on Main Street is from 12-2:00pm on Saturday, October 27. Following the event, in conjunction with Haunted Harvest, trick-or-treaters can take part in the Costume Parade and win prizes at Matthew Thornton School.

Walk-in registration begins Saturday, October 20 through October 27, at the RE/MAX 1st Choice office, located at Crossroads Mall in Londonderry, at the intersection of Routes 128 and 102. A map of participating businesses will be given out at registration.

This year, two boxes for optional donations to Toys for Tots or the local Food Pantry will be set up.  Please contact RE/MAX 1st Choice at 603-425-2400 or kskinner(at)remax.net for more information.

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Mystery Remains About Start of Halloween Tradition

Just in at 9:15am Monday Trick or Treat in Londonderry will be Sunday November 6th from 4pm to 7pm

This story was written and published four hours before the change in trick or treating day and time in Londonderry.

This Monday, houses throughout Londonderry will be preparing for visitors upon nightfall. Porch lights, strobe lights, and street lights will illuminate the town as hundreds, possibly thousands, hit the street for tricks and treats. Parents will dress their children, and themselves, in costumes, makeup, and reflective stickers. Bowls of candy will be left on the front porches of houses decorated with pumpkins and spider webs. But how did the tradition begin?

Several sources point back to the European countries, particularly Ireland and England, as the beginning of the trick-or-treat tradition. Believed to have began hundreds of year’s ago, the tradition probably dates back to the early All Souls’ Day, originally held on November 2. During the festivities, poor citizens would go door to door and beg for food. The families would give the beggars pastries called “soul cakes” in return for their promises to pray for the family’s dead relatives.

The distribution of these “soul cakes” was encouraged by the church as a way to replace the ancient practice of leaving food and wine for returning spirits on Halloween night. The practice, then known as “going a-souling,” was eventually done by the children in the neighborhood. Children would visit the houses and the “soul cakes” were eventually replaced with ale, food and money.

The tradition of dressing in costumes and masks seems to have it’s roots in the European and Celtic history. It was believed that on Halloween, ghosts would come back to earth. People thought that they would encounter ghosts if they left their homes on that day. Therefore, to avoid being seen by the ghosts, they would wear masks when they left their homes after dark so the ghosts would mistake them for fellow spirits.

Londonderry will trick-or-treat on Halloween night. Scheduled to run from 5 to 8 PM, parents should look for houses with the porch light on!

Another reason costumes may have been worn was to scare away demons. During this era, people believed that demon were the cause of misfortunes such as droughts, diseases and natural disasters. If people left their houses with scary masks, the demons would not bother them and the families would be fortunate.

It is believed that trick-or-treating was brought to America by the Irish in about 1840 when several left Ireland during the potato famine. The first known written reference of the tradition was in 1911 in Canada. The Kingston, Ontario newspaper reported that it was normal for children to go “guising,” one term that was commonly used, between the hours of 6 and 7 PM. The children would visit houses and shops and be rewarded with nuts and candies for their songs and rhymes.

Over the years, the popularity of trick-or-treating in America fluctuated. In the 1980′s, there were scares of razor blades and poisons in the candy, causing a decrease in the tradition; this has since been proven to be myth. In 2005, the National Confectioners Association preformed a survey that showed 93% of children, teens and young adults planned to go trick-or-treating or participate in other Halloween activities. Now, trick-or-treating is a tradition that millions of children look forward to each year.

For the history of the Jack O’Lantern, read Londonderry Pumpkins Make Spooky Jack O’Lanterns.

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2011 Trick or Treating Set for 5 to 8 Monday Night

With Halloween and Londonderry Trick or Treating falling on a Monday, Londonderry Police would like to remind everyone to have a fun and safe time. The police have released the following safety tips for a more enjoyable time by all.

Trick or Treating will be held this year on Halloween from 5 PM until 8 PM. This is an hour earlier than past years!

Plan your Halloween weekend ahead of time.

  • Find out which day in your community is the official trick or treat day/evening. Some communities will declare Saturday October 29, Sunday October 30, or Monday October 31 (or all of those nights) as trick or treating nights.
  • You have a number of choices for both weekend days and evenings.
  • You can take your children to a sponsored event, or more than one event. Churches, shopping centers and malls, city parks and recreation departments, public libraries and schools can all be sponsors of trick or treat events this weekend.
  • You can do traditional house to house trick or treating.
  • You can host a Halloween party so the kids have a safe place to be. A video, apple cider, hot chocolate and pumpkins can go a long way in keeping kids safe.

Plan your trick or treating route.

  • If you live in an established child-oriented neighborhood, then you probably already have your route planned.
  • If you’re not certain what trick or treating route might be best, ask your neighbors. People who walk their dogs or jog can often tell you exactly where the safe, child-oriented neighborhoods are.

Make sure your children are costumed for safety.

  • It’s really important for each child to have glow bands or sticks, or reflective tape and flashlights so they can be seen in the dark.
  • We suggest you design their “lighting” so you can easily identify them, since we know kids tend to race around in the dark on this festive night. You may want to create a special pattern with reflective tape for the back of their costumes, or have a certain combination of glow band colors for children under your care.

Be visible and present for the children throughout the Halloween experience.

  • Follow your children around, whether they like it or not.
  • When the children knock on the door to get a treat, stand behind them on the porch. That way the kids are free to enjoy themselves, and the person opening the door can clearly see an adult is caring for these children.
  • We recommend you remain just as present and just as vigilant at sponsored events. All sorts of people attend these events, and occasionally someone who is up-to-no-good will attend as well.

Prepare your children for Halloween safety.

  • Provide each child with a wristband with your name and cell phone number. Or, write this information on a piece of paper and place it in each child’s pocket.
  • Remind them to not get near cars or into cars without your express permission.
  • Remind them of who they can ask for help if they get lost.
  • Remind them of the 4 adult behaviors to be alarmed about, and how to respond.
    • “If any adult or older kid offers you anything without asking me, step way back, yell, ‘NO!’, run away, and tell.” (This applies to candy, pets, treats, job offers, photographs, rides on motorcycles, etc.)
    • “If any adult or older kid asks for your help without asking me first, step way back, yell ‘NO!’, run away and tell.” (This applies to mailing a letter, picking something up for an injured person, approaching a car to give directions, doing yard work, looking for a lost puppy, etc.)
    • “If any adult or old kid asks you to keep a secret, step way back, yell ‘NO!’, run away, and tell.”
    • “If any adult or older kid touches your private parts (parts covered by a swim suit) or asks you to touch your private parts or somebody else’s, step way back, yell ‘NO!’, run away and tell.”


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