Dump Guys

It was an early start for sure. But for these quality outings, it’s always worth it. On this beautiful Saturday morning, I spent an hour piling everything in the back of the truck – careful not to scratch the paint – stopped off at Dunkin’ for a coffee, and headed off down the road with a song in my heart. Yes, I was on my way to…the dump.

Now okay, it’s technically not the dump in our town. It’s the Drop Off Center. And we can’t just dump stuff there in a big pile as in days of yore. We now back our vehicles up a steep hill to the edge of a dumpster and drop our junk off the side – hence the name Drop Off Center, I guess. There are separate dumpsters for metal and others for construction materials, which include everything else that isn’t specifically collected. They gather TVs, batteries, and tires in separate containers. All very neat and clean. Yes, sir, a nice, clean dump.

This beautiful morning, I was greeted by a smiling attendant at the hallowed gates of the drop off center. As polite as a waiter in any first-class restaurant, he looked over my load, pretending to take my word for what was buried in there. But he really didn’t. I caught his sideward glance behind our old grill, the little peak he stole under the pile of rotten wood. I was dealing with a real professional here – he knew all the tricks that a dishonest dumper might try to pull. He gave me a price. I gave him a check. Paying to drop off your trash – a concept as strange as paying to watch TV for those who grew up with three free channels and the town dump right around the corner.

I stepped out of the truck, just to stretch a bit before ascending the slope. I breathed in deeply, expecting to capture a taste of that vibrant dump air that I recalled from my youth. But of course, it wasn’t the same. The smell of old wood, plasterboard, and rusted metal, all neatly contained in huge dumpsters, just doesn’t come close to those steaming piles of dump junk, containing God-knows-what hazardous materials, garbage, and tires from my early years. But I stretched anyhow. It just seemed the respectable thing to do.

Three other vehicles were at the edge of the construction materials dumpster when I backed my truck up. Two gentlemen and a lady. One of the guys hiked his pants over a huge belly and, with a nod and tip of the hat, acknowledged my presence. The other bellowed out a hearty “Good morning!” as if we were a couple of pals in the neighborhood gym before a squash game – although this guy looked like he grew squash rather than played squash. The suspenders and John Deere cap gave him away. Just two regular guys. Dump guys. My kinda guys.

The woman was of a different caliber. Dressed as if for a casual walk around the block, she completely ignored us, intent on clearing her trunk of its neatly stacked piles of wood. Now, a true dump guy would have burned that wood in his fireplace or wood stove, or maybe begun to build a shed or fishing boat with it. But I have to credit the woman for bringing her pile o’ wood to the dump rather than hiding it in her curbside trash bags. And I was smitten with her colorful lime green garden gloves…another reason why we have a clean dump. But I’ll bet she still stopped off at McDonald’s rest room on the way home, just to wash her hands. A dump is, after all, only so clean.

I was glad to have arrived early, beating the crowd to this popular weekend retreat. Well fortified with nutritious coffee and a low fat, cholesterol-free coconut donut (not), I had the energy to heave the remains of my dilapidated shed and an old couch into the belly of that dumpster, enjoying every crunching sound. Like any guy, I relish the opportunity to smash things in a safe environment – that is, away from my wife’s watchful eye. No doubt, a throwback to caveman days. My dump buddies enjoyed it too. They had already tossed their loads in and were just leaning against their trucks, standing in pools of sweat and learning to breathe again. But they still had enough stamina to goad me on with every toss of my stuff. I felt like Superman.

Alas, the joy ended all too soon. The bed of my truck emptied quickly. I swept it out, descended from the slope, and stepped out of the cab for one more quick sniff before leaving. It’s not the same, but I’ll just have to get used to this new, cleaner dump smell – excuse me, this Drop Off Center smell. Then I headed home for a shower. Some smells you do have to wash away.

Visit Londonderry Hometown Online News every Tuesday Morning for another one of Joe’s great columns! Select “Share this story” and share your favorite columnist with your friends!


Joe’s Two Cents – It’s Great To Be Alive is Joe Paradis’ first published book and gathers 40 of his most popular stories, enhancing them with humorous photography. The book is a compilation of forty of Joe’s best short stories.

Injecting humor into topics from everyday life, Joe answers those earth-shattering questions we all have about the beach, the bathroom, the junk drawer. From guys’ tools to girl talk. High school seniors to the senior years.

This classic collection has been updated to include pictures and a short introduction for each story. Until now, only God knew what possessed Joe to write about these things. Now you can too!

Joe Paradis is one of Londonderry’s most popular columnists and authors. Visit his web site at www.joes2cents.com today and order his latest autographed book, “It’s Great to Be Alive!”

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Dump Guys

It was an early start for sure. But for these quality outings, it’s always worth it. On this beautiful Saturday morning, I spent an hour piling everything in the back of the truck – careful not to scratch the paint – stopped off at Dunkin’ for a coffee, and headed off down the road with a song in my heart. Yes, I was on my way to…the dump.

Now okay, it’s technically not the dump in our town. It’s the Drop Off Center. And we can’t just dump stuff there in a big pile as in days of yore. We now back our vehicles up a steep hill to the edge of a dumpster and drop our junk off the side – hence the name Drop Off Center, I guess. There are separate dumpsters for metal and others for construction materials, which include everything else that isn’t specifically collected. They gather TVs, batteries, and tires in separate containers. All very neat and clean. Yes, sir, a nice, clean dump.

This beautiful morning, I was greeted by a smiling attendant at the hallowed gates of the drop off center. As polite as a waiter in any first-class restaurant, he looked over my load, pretending to take my word for what was buried in there. But he really didn’t. I caught his sideward glance behind our old grill, the little peak he stole under the pile of rotten wood. I was dealing with a real professional here – he knew all the tricks that a dishonest dumper might try to pull. He gave me a price. I gave him a check. Paying to drop off your trash – a concept as strange as paying to watch TV for those who grew up with three free channels and the town dump right around the corner.

I stepped out of the truck, just to stretch a bit before ascending the slope. I breathed in deeply, expecting to capture a taste of that vibrant dump air that I recalled from my youth. But of course, it wasn’t the same. The smell of old wood, plasterboard, and rusted metal, all neatly contained in huge dumpsters, just doesn’t come close to those steaming piles of dump junk, containing God-knows-what hazardous materials, garbage, and tires from my early years. But I stretched anyhow. It just seemed the respectable thing to do.

Three other vehicles were at the edge of the construction materials dumpster when I backed my truck up. Two gentlemen and a lady. One of the guys hiked his pants over a huge belly and, with a nod and tip of the hat, acknowledged my presence. The other bellowed out a hearty “Good morning!” as if we were a couple of pals in the neighborhood gym before a squash game – although this guy looked like he grew squash rather than played squash. The suspenders and John Deere cap gave him away. Just two regular guys. Dump guys. My kinda guys.

The woman was of a different caliber. Dressed as if for a casual walk around the block, she completely ignored us, intent on clearing her trunk of its neatly stacked piles of wood. Now, a true dump guy would have burned that wood in his fireplace or wood stove, or maybe begun to build a shed or fishing boat with it. But I have to credit the woman for bringing her pile o’ wood to the dump rather than hiding it in her curbside trash bags. And I was smitten with her colorful lime green garden gloves…another reason why we have a clean dump. But I’ll bet she still stopped off at McDonald’s rest room on the way home, just to wash her hands. A dump is, after all, only so clean.

I was glad to have arrived early, beating the crowd to this popular weekend retreat. Well fortified with nutritious coffee and a low fat, cholesterol-free coconut donut (not), I had the energy to heave the remains of my dilapidated shed and an old couch into the belly of that dumpster, enjoying every crunching sound. Like any guy, I relish the opportunity to smash things in a safe environment – that is, away from my wife’s watchful eye. No doubt, a throwback to caveman days. My dump buddies enjoyed it too. They had already tossed their loads in and were just leaning against their trucks, standing in pools of sweat and learning to breathe again. But they still had enough stamina to goad me on with every toss of my stuff. I felt like Superman.

Alas, the joy ended all too soon. The bed of my truck emptied quickly. I swept it out, descended from the slope, and stepped out of the cab for one more quick sniff before leaving. It’s not the same, but I’ll just have to get used to this new, cleaner dump smell – excuse me, this Drop Off Center smell. Then I headed home for a shower. Some smells you do have to wash away.

Visit Londonderry Hometown Online News every Tuesday Morning for another one of Joe’s great columns! Select “Share this story” and share your favorite columnist with your friends!


Joe’s Two Cents – It’s Great To Be Alive is Joe Paradis’ first published book and gathers 40 of his most popular stories, enhancing them with humorous photography. The book is a compilation of forty of Joe’s best short stories.

Injecting humor into topics from everyday life, Joe answers those earth-shattering questions we all have about the beach, the bathroom, the junk drawer. From guys’ tools to girl talk. High school seniors to the senior years.

This classic collection has been updated to include pictures and a short introduction for each story. Until now, only God knew what possessed Joe to write about these things. Now you can too!

Joe Paradis is one of Londonderry’s most popular columnists and authors. Visit his web site at www.joes2cents.com today and order his latest autographed book, “It’s Great to Be Alive!”

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Londonderry Drop Off Center Opens for Season

Londonderry’s Drop Off Center will open this Saturday, April 6, 2013, for the season and will continue to be open every Saturday from 8 AM until 4 PM until November 23, 2013. The drop off center accepts items both for free and for a fee depending on the item. Fees must be paid in personal checks only. No cash or credit cards will be accepted.

At no charge, the following items will be accepted:

Yard Waste: leaves, branches, and grass clippings. A limit of one 6-wheel dump truck of brush is in place.

Plastics: all rigid plastics with or without a recycling symbol of any size. This excludes styrofoam, plastic tarps, inflatable toys and plastic wrap.

Textiles: any reusable item of clothing, draperies, and linens for the Salvation Army.

Corrugated Cardboard: packing boxes and other packaging cardboard, packed flat.

Rechargeable Batteries: please give to attendants; batteries from camcorders, cell phones calculators and laptops.

Automobile Batteries

Fluorescent Bulbs: unbroken.

Cell Phones: please give to attendants.

The following items will be accepted for the indicated fee:

Scrap Metal, $5 per load: Aluminum, steel, brass, copper, and virtually any item made from metal will be recycled except those containing Freon.

Construction Debris, $24 per cubic yard, minimum $7 up to 55-gallon barrel: Pressure treated lumber, fiberglass, cement, plastic piping, wiring, sheetrock, lumber and any other building materials. Railroad ties, asbestos, paint cans, gas cans, and liquids of any kind will NOT be accepted.

Furniture, large item $14, small item $7: large items include tables, sofas and mattresses full size and larger; small items include chairs and twin mattresses.

Carpet, $24 per cubic yard

Tires, 4 free with car registration, additional $2 without rim, $3 with rim each

Electronics: Large $14 commercial size fax and copy machines, televisions larger than 20″; Medium $7 computers, monitors, televisions less than or equal to 20″; Small no charge mouse, keyboards, wiring.

Overflow bags are available for $3 each.

The Town’s Drop Off Center is located off West Road. For more information, contact the Department of Public Works at 432-1100 extension 137.

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Town Drop of Center Opens this Weekend

Londonderry’s Drop Off Center will open this Saturday, April 7, 2012, for the season and will continue to be open every Saturday from 8 AM until 4 PM until November 17, 2012. The drop off center accepts items both for free and for a fee depending on the item. Fees must be paid in personal checks only. No cash or credit cards will be accepted.

At no charge, the following items will be accepted:

Yard Waste; leaves, branches, and grass clippings. A limit of one 6-wheel dump truck of brush is in place.

Plastics; all rigid plastics with or without a recycling symbol of any size. This excludes styrofoam, plastic tarps, inflatable toys and plastic wrap.

Textiles; any reusable item of clothing, draperies, and linens for the Salvation Army.

Corrugated Cardboard; packing boxes and other packaging cardboard, packed flat.

Rechargeable Batteries; please give to attendants; batteries from camcorders, cell phones calculators and laptops.

Automobile Batteries.

Fluorescent Bulbs; unbroken.

Cell Phones; please give to attendants.

The following items will be accepted for the indicated fee:

Scrap Metal, $5 per load; Aluminum, steel, brass, copper, and virtually any item made from metal will be recycled except those containing Freon.

Construction Debris, $24 per cubic yard, minimum $7 up to 55-gallon barrel; Pressure treated lumber, fiberglass, cement, plastic piping, wiring, sheetrock, lumber and any other building materials. Railroad ties, asbestos, paint cans, gas cans, and liquids of any kind will NOT be accepted.

Furniture, large item $14, small item $7; large items include tables, sofas and mattresses full size and larger; small items include chairs and twin mattresses.

Carpet, $24 per cubic yard.

Tires, 4 free with car registration, additional $2 without rim, $3 with rim each.

Electronics; Large $14 commercial size fax and copy machines; Medium $7 computers, monitors, televisions; Small no charge mouse, keyboards, wiring.

Overflow bags are available for $3 each.

The Town’s Drop Off Center is located off West Road. For more information, contact the Department of Public Works at 432-1100 extension 137.

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Final Saturday for Town’s Drop Off Center

Actually called the Londonderry Drop Off Center, “the dump” will close this Saturday, November 19, 2011, at 4pm and will not reopen until April 2012. The date in April is determined after the thaw. The hours from April to November are 8am to 4pm, try not to show up right at 4pm, you still have to unload. You must bring a check, no cash is accepted. Only Londonderry residents are allowed to use the dump, regulars need no id, the guys get to know you. This transfer station is located off West Road, not too far from Route 102.

These items are free.

  • Yards Waste: Leaves, branches, grass clippings. (Limit one 6-wheel dump truck of brush)
  • Textiles: Any reusable item of clothing, draperies and linens for the Salvation Army
  • Plastics: All rigid plastics with or without a recycling symbol, any size accepted. NO Styrofoam, plastic tarps, inflatable toys and floats or plastic wrap.
  • Corrugated Cardboard: Packing boxes and other packaging cardboard, packed flat.
  • Rechargeable Batteries: From camcorders, cell-phones, calculators, and laptops; please give to attendants.
  • Automobile Batteries
  • Fluorescent Bulbs: Unbroken
  • Cell-phones: Please give to attendant.

These items are fee based on what you have and how much you bring.

  • Scrap Metal: $5.00 per load – Aluminum, steel, brass, copper, and virtually any item made from metal will be recycled except those containing Freon.

NO propane tank – take to Benson’s Hardware.

NO air conditioners, refrigerators, dehumidifiers or any appliance using freon!

  • Construction Debris: $24.00 per cubic yard, minimum $7 up to 55-gallon barrel
    - Acceptable Items: Pressure treated lumber, fiberglass, cement, plastic piping, wiring, Sheetrock, lumber, and any other building materials.
    - Not Acceptable Items – Railroad ties, asbestos, paint cans, gas cans, no liquids of any kind.
  • Furniture: Large Item $14.00 each (sofa, tables, full mattresses etc.)
  • Small Item $7.00 each (chair, twin mattresses, etc.)
  • Carpet: $24.00 per cubic yard
  • Tires: 4 Free with car registration, additional tires $2.00 without rim, $3.00 with rim.
  • Electronics: $14.00 commercial size fax and copy machines; $7.00 each all other items. (no charge mice, keyboards, wiring)
  • Overflow bags: $3.00 each (30-gallon overflow bags for curbside trash collection)

We have no “Dump” in Londonderry since we have free curbside pickup for residents included in our taxes. This curbside pickup has a extensive recycling program that is very flexible and aggressive for the region. Homeowners that recycle not only help the environment they reduce the tonnage that is picked up by the trash trucks. This keeps the cost down and affects the taxes on your home.

 

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Dump to Open Saturday

After much anticipation, and a lot of renovation, the Londonderry Drop Off Center is scheduled to open this Saturday, May 14, 2011! The town’s only dump will be open until November 19, 2011, on Saturday’s only, from 8 AM until 4 PM. The Drop Off Center’s opening was delayed due to reconstruction.

At no charge, the following items will be accepted:

Yard Waste; leaves, branches, and grass clippings. A limit of one 6-wheel dump truck of brush is in place.

Textiles; any reusable item of clothing, draperies, and linens for the Salvation Army.

Corrugated Cardboard; Packing boxes and other packaging cardboard, packed flat.

Rechargeable Batteries; please give to attendants; batteries from camcorders, cell phones calculators and laptops.

Automobile Batteries.

Fluorescent Bulbs; unbroken.

Cell Phones; please give to attendants.

The following items will be accepted for the indicated fee:

Scrap Metal, $5 per load; Aluminum, steel, brass, copper, and virtually any item made from metal will be recycled except those containing Freon.

Construction Debris, $24 per cubic yard, minimum $7 up to 55-gallon barrel; Pressure treated lumber, fiberglass, cement, plastic piping, wiring, sheetrock, lumber and any other building materials. Railroad ties, asbestos, paint cans, gas cans, and liquids of any kind will NOT be accepted.

Furniture, large item $14, small item $7; large items include tables, sofas and mattresses full size and larger; small items include chairs and twin mattresses.

Carpet, $24 per cubic yard.

Tires, 4 free with car registration, additional $2 without rim, $3 with rim each.

Electronics, $14 commercial size fax and copy machines; $7 computers, monitors, televisions; no charge mouse, keyboards, wiring.

Overflow bags are available for $3 each. Please keep in mind no cash is accepted at the Drop Off Center, checks only.

For more information on the Drop Off Center’s renovations, read Londonderry’s Extreme Dump Makeover.

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