Londonderry Bridge Named After Two Fallen Marines

Governor Lynch signed a bill recently naming a newly constructed bridge in Londonderry after two local fallen United States Marines. Located on the Airport Access Road, the bridge will now be named in honor of Lance Corporal Peter J. Sora, Jr. and Private First Class Eric D. Currier.

The bridge closest to the traffic circle in this image has now become the Sora-Currier Memorial Bridge. Click for a larger image.

Lance Corporal Sora joined the Marines in 2003 and died during a training accident in 2004 while preparing for deployment. Private First Class Currier, who was recently married, joined the Marines in 2009. He was killed in 2010 in Helmand Province, Afghanistan during a military operation.

Governor Lynch signs the bill while members of both families look on.

After voting unanimously in February this year, the New Hampshire Senate passed the bill on to the House, and finally to Lynch’s desk. Surrounded by members of both families, as well as primary supporter of the bill Senator Sharon Carson, Lynch signed the bill officially naming the bridge.

Effective immediately, the bridge is now known as the Sora-Currier Memorial Bridge.

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Senate Passes Bill to Name Londonderry Bridge After Fallen Marines

The New Hampshire Senate voted unanimously on a bill that will name a Londonderry bridge after two fallen United States Marines hailing from the town. The bridge, located on the newly constructed Airport Access Road, will honor Lance Corporal Peter J. Sora, Jr., and Private First Class Eric D. Currier.

Family members of the two young men gathered in the Chamber as the voting took place yesterday, February 8, 2012. During his floor remarks, Senator Jim Rausch, R-Derry, turned to the families as he spoke. “On behalf of the entire Senate, I want to offer my deepest condolences to you for the loss of your sons who made the ultimate sacrifice for their country. We are forever grateful to them.”

Airport Access Road, Londonderry, NH, Sora/Currier Memorial Bridge

Once the bill is passed by the House, the bridge closest to the traffic circle in this image will become the Sora/Currier Memorial Bridge. Click for a larger image.

According to Senator Rausch, Lance Corporal Sora joined the Marines in 2003 and died during a training accident in 2004 while preparing for deployment. Private First Class Currier, who was recently married, joined the Marines in 2009. He was killed in 2010 in Helmand Province, Afghanistan during a military operation. “Their deaths are a loss to all of us, especially those in the community of Londonderry where both men resided. It is our hope that the naming of this bridge will honor these two courageous men and inspire admiration for all those who fight for our country,” added Rausch.

Bridge over Cohas construction in Aug 2009

Seen here is the construction of the bridge over Little Cohas Brook in August of 2009.

Prime sponsor of the bill, Senator Carson, R-Londonderry, echoed Rausch’s remarks. “I am deeply honored to have the opportunity to work in this legislation. Finding a way to remember our fallen heroes can come in many forms, but it is always heartfelt. We can all take comfort in the fact the Sora/Currier Memorial Bridge will stand a long time. The entire Senate was moved by the loss of these brave Marines as well as the presence of so many of their relatives who witnessed the vote on this bill in person.”

The bridge was constructed as part of the new road connecting Londonderry with Bedford and Merrimack. It crosses the Little Cohas Brook, a historic site in Londonderry. In the early 1900′s, a trolley car ran a regular route over the Cohas as it made it’s way to Cohas Spring, where visitors would take in the natural beauty of Londonderry and the fresh clean waters of the natural spring.

Cohas Trolley crossing from North Londonderry to Cohas Spring in 1905

A trolley crosses the Cohas bridge as it makes it way to Cohas Spring in 1905.

With the voting completed, the bill, SB367, will now head to the House where it is expected to pass. Following approval from the House, it will be sent to Governor Lynch’s desk for his signature.

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